September 28, 2006

Book meme 2

Posted in Censorship, Literature, Memes, Personal at 8:01 pm by The Lizard Queen

In honor of Banned Books Week, which ends on Saturday, I put together this little meme… if you like it, feel free to use it!

What I did: I winnowed the following list from the American Library Association’s Top 100 Most Challenged Books of 1990-2000. I removed picture books and other books aimed at the under-8 crowd (Where’s Waldo; Bumps in the Night), along with Sex Ed books (What’s Happening to My Body?; Asking About Sex and Growing Up — no answers for you, you naughty puberty-stricken heathen!).

What you’ll do: highlight in bold the books you’ve read; comment as desired; look into reading more banned books!

Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz (read the first one, anyway…)
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
Forever by Judy Blume
Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Alice (Series) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine
A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
Sex by Madonna
Earth’s Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel
The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Go Ask Alice by Anonymous
Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
The Witches by Roald Dahl
The New Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein
Anastasia Krupnik (Series) by Lois Lowry (Again, read the first one, at least…)
The Goats by Brock Cole
Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane
Blubber by Judy Blume
Killing Mr. Griffin by Lois Duncan
We All Fall Down by Robert Cormier
Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying by Derek Humphry
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George
The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Beloved by Toni Morrison
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

The Pigman by Paul Zindel
Deenie by Judy Blume
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
Annie on my Mind by Nancy Garden
The Boy Who Lost His Face by Louis Sachar
A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice) (Huh–are we seeing a pattern here? I read the first one…)
Cujo by Stephen King
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
Ordinary People by Judith Guest
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
Crazy Lady by Jane Conly
Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher
Fade by Robert Cormier
The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende
The Face on the Milk Carton by Caroline Cooney
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Native Son by Richard Wright
Women on Top: How Real Life Has Changed Women’s Fantasies by Nancy Friday
Curses, Hexes and Spells by Daniel Cohen
Jack by A.M. Homes
Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo A. Anaya
Carrie by Stephen King
Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume
On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer
Arizona Kid by Ron Koertge
Family Secrets by Norma Klein
The Dead Zone by Stephen King
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
Always Running by Luis Rodriguez
Private Parts by Howard Stern
Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene
Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman
Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
Running Loose by Chris Crutcher
Sex Education [a novel] by Jenny Davis
The Drowning of Stephen Jones by Bette Greene
How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell
View from the Cherry Tree by Willo Davis Roberts
The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
The Terrorist by Caroline Cooney
Jump Ship to Freedom by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier

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8 Comments »

  1. DavidD said,

    You never read Brave New World? It’s what everyone read along with 1984 at one point, before the real eighties came.

    It’s not that great, actually. It has an interesting and well-illustrated idea that the state has taken over making babies and engineers them into different classes of abilities, alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, to match job requirements, so everyone is happy, except many have to take drugs to stay happy.

    I suppose that last part was problematic for some do-gooders. Also when the heroine goes out to the primitive area where people still reproduce naturally, the main primitive character observes her breasts while she sleeps. That I remember better than any actual sex scenes, which I think there were at some point, maybe only implied, not dwelled upon.

    It would have been a better book if it had explored more incisively which is better, nature or a thoroughly managed society. I think Huxley makes a mistake many sci-fi writers make in that he makes his oppressive force so strong, so perfect that all there is to oppose it is some vague reactionary response like, “I don’t like it. It’s not natural.” In fact genetically engineering everyone would have many problems. I guess that’s one reason why this book is dated now. Many people would know too much genetics to accept its premise well.

    So it doesn’t need to be rescued, in my opinion.

  2. It’s funny the things you only remember years later. Like today, someone was talking about unisex bathrooms in kindergarten, and I suddenly remembered some girl pulling up her top in the bathroom when I was five. Weird. But the point I wanted to make . . . I remember reading Robert Cormier’s Fade as a kid, and being deeply troubled by it. I always remembered the book, but I never remember the name or the author. And then, looking at the list, I saw it, and I saw that it was by the author the The Chocolate War, and I’d never made the connection. I’d still recommend Fade to anyone–in fact, I look forward to reading it again now that I’ve remembered it. Thank you Lizard Queen.

    Everyone should read Jack by A.M. Holmes. If not that, then The Safety of Objects. Crack head suburbanites and boys having sex with Barbie dolls. Nuff said.

  3. MishkaP said,

    According to this list I did my most provocative reading from 11-16 – everything after that was no doubt, drivel. My school banned Deenie, by Judy Blume, about the girl with scoliosis who liked to masturbate in the tub and who probably learned other stuff. I mostly learned how to masturbate in the tub.

  4. Cara M. said,

    L- you should read Native Son, at least the first half of it anyway. I know, I know, add it to the list 🙂

    Scary Stories (Series) by Alvin Schwartz
    I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou (beautiful is all I can say)
    The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier (gut-wrenching- it does not have a happy ending)
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
    Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
    Harry Potter (Series) by J.K. Rowling
    Forever by Judy Blume (I’ve never read anything by Judy Blume… I kind of leapfrogged over those books. Looks like I was missing out!)
    Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
    Alice (Series) by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (I did love her witches series though… guess no one reads those anymore)
    My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier (I’ve read parts of it- it’s awful.)
    The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger (brilliant!)
    The Giver by Lois Lowry
    Goosebumps (Series) by R.L. Stine
    A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck
    The Color Purple by Alice Walker
    Sex by Madonna
    Earth’s Children (Series) by Jean M. Auel
    The Great Gilly Hopkins by Katherine Paterson
    A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
    Go Ask Alice by Anonymous
    Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
    The Witches by Roald Dahl
    The New Joy of Gay Sex by Charles Silverstein
    Anastasia Krupnik (Series) by Lois Lowry
    The Goats by Brock Cole
    Kaffir Boy by Mark Mathabane
    Blubber by Judy Blume
    Killing Mr. Griffin by Lois Duncan
    We All Fall Down by Robert Cormier
    Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying by Derek Humphry
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood (One of my favorites)
    Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George (also read parts of it- it was in the curriculum at my old school- the kids hated it)
    The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (Arguably one of the greatest books ever written)
    Beloved by Toni Morrison (On the shelf)
    The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton (parts of it)
    The Pigman by Paul Zindel
    Deenie by Judy Blume
    Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
    Annie on my Mind by Nancy Garden
    The Boy Who Lost His Face by Louis Sachar
    A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein (what’s wrong with this one?)
    Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
    Sleeping Beauty Trilogy by A.N. Roquelaure (Anne Rice)
    Cujo by Stephen King
    James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl (Okay really now, what’s wrong with this one too?!)
    The Anarchist Cookbook by William Powell
    Ordinary People by Judith Guest
    American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
    Are You There, God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
    Crazy Lady by Jane Conly
    Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher
    Fade by Robert Cormier
    The House of Spirits by Isabel Allende
    The Face on the Milk Carton by Caroline Cooney
    Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding
    Native Son by Richard Wright
    Women on Top: How Real Life Has Changed Women’s Fantasies by Nancy Friday
    Curses, Hexes and Spells by Daniel Cohen
    Jack by A.M. Homes
    Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo A. Anaya
    Carrie by Stephen King
    Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume
    On My Honor by Marion Dane Bauer
    Arizona Kid by Ron Koertge
    Family Secrets by Norma Klein
    The Dead Zone by Stephen King
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (I read this at the beach one year- by choice, as an adult, not for any school requirements- my family laughed at me, as usual.)
    Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison
    Always Running by Luis Rodriguez
    Private Parts by Howard Stern
    Summer of My German Soldier by Bette Greene
    Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman
    Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett (many moons ago- I don’t even remember it)
    Running Loose by Chris Crutcher
    Sex Education [a novel] by Jenny Davis
    The Drowning of Stephen Jones by Bette Greene
    How to Eat Fried Worms by Thomas Rockwell
    View from the Cherry Tree by Willo Davis Roberts
    The Headless Cupid by Zilpha Keatley Snyder
    The Terrorist by Caroline Cooney
    Jump Ship to Freedom by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier

  5. C-

    Most of the childrens books that make these lists are there for absurd reasons. I didn’t include it in my list, but Where’s Waldo is on the top 100 list, and I heard that it’s because there seems to be a topless woman on one of the pages. How many children are genuinely going to notice that?

    I know one of the reasons A Light in the Attic has been challenged is because it might prompt children to question authority–there’s one poem in there about how if you don’t like to dry the dishes, and then you drop and break a couple of dishes, they won’t ask you to dry the dishes anymore. I think James and the Giant Peach has had similar challenges: it portrays adults in a negative light, could prompt children to question authority, is “anti-family,” etc. If you ask me, these parents are worried about the entirely wrong things…

  6. pavlov112 said,

    We can’t have kids questioning their parents, now, can we? I’m suddenly reminded of a bumper sticker my freshman biology teacher had posted in her classroom:

    Question Authority (But Raise Your Hand First)

    It took me a while to appreciate the irony.

    And maybe it’s just because it’s been years since I read it, but who would want to ban “How to Eat Fried Worms”?!

  7. Alex said,

    Thank You

  8. BrianK said,

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